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Thread: Why its important to spay/neuter your pets

  1. #21
    Young Pup
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Matrioshka Click here to enlarge
    If you neuter your dog, isn't it possible that it may have the tendency to eat more and get fat?
    Weight should depend heavily on activity level. I'm sure most Boston's will still want to run and play just like they did before the snip.

  2. #22
    Round Head Jojo Bananas's Avatar
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Matrioshka Click here to enlarge
    If you neuter your dog, isn't it possible that it may have the tendency to eat more and get fat?
    BTs get fat because their owners get lazy, don't exercise them enough, and/or over feed. Intact or not.
    LIDuck likes this.

  3. #23
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    It’s also better for your pet’s health. And it’s better for you because it will make your life easier if your pet is spayed or neutered. Animals can be miserable -- and make you miserable -- when they are in heat. And then there’s always the problem of what to do with the puppies.








    I am a huge fan of dogs and have 2 BostonTerrier at my place. I like to discuss on and or pet gossips related their food, accessories, health problems.

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  5. #24
    All-American Dog
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    My Seven month old male got his rabies shot two weeks ago. During the exam, the conversation turned to neutering. The vet was of the opinion that there are very few health reasons for a male to be neutered, and that I did not have to do it.

    I was very suprised at her position. She added that he is in a fenced yard, does not go to dog parks, is on a leash at all times, and lives a quiet life. He is not going to be shown. She said if his behavior becomes disruptive, or he marks in the house, then he could be neutered, otherwise it is not necessary. This is the second vet I have spoken to with the same opinion. I don't know what to make of it.

  6. #25
    Round Head ChelseaLynn's Avatar
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    The problem is that once your dog starts those behaviors from not being neutered there is a high chance they will not go away. If you wait till your dog starks marking and getting aggressive neutering at that point will probably be too late because they've now learned that behaviour. And yes there are lots of health reasons to spay and neuter. Plus all it takes is your dog to get out of the yard once for him to find a female in heat. Dogs can smell a female in heat from a very far distance. My friend has a male that is not neutered and holy crap this dog will do anything and everything to get out of the yard because he smells a female in heat! He's managed to figure out so many ways to get out of the yard.

    And can I ask how do you socialize your dog properly if it's never around any other dogs. Makes that are not neuter can get very aggressive. Why would you want to risk that? That vet is stupid for recommending you to not neuter. It's the responsible thing to do for your pet and also to prevent mistakes from happening. and trust me every friend I know that had a male that was not neutered they managed to get out even for a few minutes and get a female dog pregnant. I highly recommend you to do research on this. If you arent breeding your dog get him neutered. Then you don't have to worry about him trying to escape. Plus males listen way better when neutered. If he accidentally gets let out he will be gone so fast. Be responsible and neuter your dog. Think of the consequences of not. Do research because there are many health problems linked to unneutered males.

  7. #26
    All-American Dog
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    I am going to go ahead and look into the health risks of both neutering, and not neutering a male. The idea of him getting out in search of a female truly freaks me out. I had male Yellow Lab, and one week, like a switch went off in his head, his behavior changed for the worst. He got wild and disobedient, and headstrong. I had planned to get him neutered, and the behavior change pushed me to make the appointment immediately. My lab was seven months.

    As for socializing Pilot, he went to puppy obedience class for eight weeks, and loved it. I have not had him around other dogs since. I advertised for play dates via Craigslist, and got nowhere. Then I got totally focused on planning a new kitchen. Click here to enlarge

  8. #27
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    I know in USA almost everybody is spaying/neutering their pets. That is OK, because there are a lot homeless pets because of people that don't care and let their dog or cat do as they please. In my opinion if the owners are responsible and the dog doesn't have problems there is no need for this procedure, but there are pros and cons and actually each owner should decide by themselves.

    I have intact girl. I don't plan to have puppies and if she won't have problems with heats she will stay as she is. I don't see a problem here, it's like a woman would decide she don't want to have kids and she would go under procedure because of it.

    But there still are cases when I would totally agree and even recommend doing it. I would do it if the male shows aggression caused by dominance towards other males, that for me would be the right moment to spay. But really, like the ones before me said, you should not wait long then. Do it the same week before the behavior get's in his nature and for a couple of weeks try to avoid aggressive situations of any kind (a couple of weeks because after an operation it needs a month or two to "sink" in). But you have to be sure it's the dominance it's causing the aggression. If the dog fears of something and you spay him, you need to know that it could get worse or not get better at all.

    I would do the same if the female would start to treat plush toys as her puppies or for any other medical reason.

    Here is an real life example when the neutering worked, but not because the dog changed, it's just the other dogs changed:
    My sister has a dog. He just turned 6 and is a whippet. He LOVED all dogs, but then one day at the age 4, he was chasing a dog, and to make the story short, got hit by a car. He had a mild concussion, got some stitches but was OK pretty quickly. But he.. oh man, he is a funny thinking dog. He has a weird way of linking what and why something happened and he blamed the other dog for the accident. And after that point in time he started to show aggression (mostly launching and barking) towards other dogs (gender didn't matter). But this aggression he was showing wasn't problem of him not being neutered, he just got fearful of dogs and when he could not avoid the dog, he got his defense on. And for him it worked. The other dog avoided him and he felt safe. Since we're living in a city the dogs could not be avoided at all times. My sister didn't know what to do. Spaying him could get his ego even lower and defense even stronger so she tried every method she could think of to get him better, but he was only getting worse. So she got him spayed 6 months ago. We were so nervous but we're extremely LUCKY. Since his crown jewels we're removed, the other dogs are not longer interested in him (he is for then not a male and not a female in heat), not invading his space anymore so he is really getting better. But if some dogs crosses the line he still barks and growls.

    So be careful if you are doing it because some behavior problem.

  9. #28
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    This was written in 2009 but I think I'm the last 6 years there has been some changes. Supposedly neutering before a year can end up causing more problems and neutering before 6 months can end up causing the worst problems. Looking back on my dogs I spayed my dachshunds early and they had nothing but behavioral and health issues. Whereas the Boston I inherited through marriage was neutered shortly after a year and he was the healthiest best dog until a congenital heart defect took him. I'm waiting until a year or maybe 18 months with my new bostons.

  10. #29
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    Oh I won't let them out without supervision and we live in an apartment so these dogs would have to open locked doors. I just want them to have their best chance.

  11. #30
    All-American Dog Barbara's Avatar
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    I agree. All my dogs were spayed and neutered before they reach their first month. As the post says, it is just as important as deciding the food you'll feed them and planning for their diet and nutrition. Every pet lovers should know that.

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