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Thread: Why its important to spay/neuter your pets

  1. #1
    Alpha Dog ginnafer's Avatar
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    Default Why its important to spay/neuter your pets

    Spaying or neutering your pet is important to their health, and prevents unwanted litters. Neutering a male before 6 months old can prevent testicular cancer and prostate disease (providing they dont carry the gene that causes it). Spaying a female prevents pyometria (pus-filled uteris) and breast cancer (again, providing they dont carry the gene that causes it). This goes the same for both male and female cats. Spaying/nuetering your pets before their first heat cycle greatly reduces their risks for these diseases, as well as UTI’s.

    Spaying and nuetering isnt a guarantee that your animal wont get certain diseases or UTI's, but it can reduce their chances of getting them. There is always a risk with putting your animals through surgery, but if you choose an experienced veterinarian it should go well. It is always important that you trust your animals veterinarian and dont think twice about switching if you feel the need to do so.

    Between 4 and 6 million pets are put down yearly because they dont have homes, which equals out to 11,000 - 16,000 pets per day being euthanized. Only 1 in 10 animals born in the US get a good forever home.

    Some veterinary offices and rescue/shelters offer reduced cost procedures may be available. Humane societies work with local veterinarians to offer spay/neutering at a lower cost to reduce the number of homeless animals and help people with a limited income afford the procedures.

    This information has come from the below websites. There is more information available by following the links if your interested.

    http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/wh..._your_pet.html

    http://www.aspca.org/site/DocServer/....pdf?docID=188

    Spay/neuter Myths and Statistics:
    http://www.almosthomerescue.org/spay...spayneuter.htm

    Information on reduced cost of spay/neuter:
    http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/wh..._neutered.html
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    Some 70,000 puppies and kittens are born daily in the US.
    4,000,000 to 6,000,000 pets are euthanized every year because they are homeless,
    11,000 to 16,000 pets are euthanized every day because they are homeless.
    An animal in a shelter is killed every 1.5 seconds.
    Only 1 animal in 10 born in the U.S. gets a good home that lasts a lifetime.

  2. #2
    sue
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    American Gentleman sue's Avatar
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    Emma goes in on the 13th of March. Way back, I would have thought "let's let her have puppies" "they are so cute", but, then I read a lot and realized that breeding should be left to the professionals that want to improve the breed.
    Click here to enlarge

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    Alpha Dog Liberty's Avatar
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    I thought about letting Badger have one litter for a few reasons: There are already loving homes waiting, I would like to keep one, there is no excess of unwanted Bostons in the UK.

    Then I thought is this something I really want to do, I don't want her to have a c section, if there was 6 puppies could I ensure they all went to a fantastic home, there is ofcourse all the vets costs.

    So I have come to the conclusion that I will not have her have puppies if in time we wish to have another it may be the point that if we are n the UK we cannot afford a Boston (£1300 -£1500) so then we should look at another breed from a rescue.

    Every dog I have ever owned I have had neutered or spayed without ever having any puppies so I feel I should do the same thing with Badger.

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    I accept with formtion:
    Between 4 and 6 million pets are put down yearly because they dont have homes, which equals out to 11,000 - 16,000 pets per day being euthanized. Only 1 in 10 animals born in the US get a good forever home.
    Between 4 and 6 million pets are put down yearly because they dont have homes, which equals out to 11,000 - 16,000 pets per day being euthanized. Only 1 in 10 animals born in the US get a good forever home.

  6. #5

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    Wink Breeding a Female Boston is Costly

    A boston terrier must have a C-section (which must be done by a VET or assisance) because they have small pelvis for natural births. Without assistance a female can die or their puppies will. This is too risky to do. Click here to enlarge Most bostons have small litters of 4 (and some have only two if the bostons are big). A boston breeder that does this for the love of the breed is the person to breed bostons. The cost of you breeding your boston female would be huge (it would be better to buy another boston or rescue one).

  7. #6
    Alpha Dog Reba-doo's Avatar
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by hayley6 Click here to enlarge
    A boston terrier must have a C-section (which must be done by a VET or assisance) because they have small pelvis for natural births. Without assistance a female can die or their puppies will. This is too risky to do. Click here to enlarge Most bostons have small litters of 4 (and some have only two if the bostons are big). A boston breeder that does this for the love of the breed is the person to breed bostons. The cost of you breeding your boston female would be huge (it would be better to buy another boston or rescue one).

    This is not true!!!! My Sally was born naturally and her mom had no problem giving birth naturally. We took the proper precautions and had her x-rayed to make sure the puppies were small enough to pass her pevis, and they did. Now not all Females can have a natural birth but i believe that if the breeders are responsible and breed for the right physical qualities then it is possible to have a natural birth. If the breeder is going for a larger headed Boston then they need to take the proper precautions and know that a c-section will be needed.



    Pipi519 likes this.
    Click here to enlarge
    Sally is Septembers Cutest Dog!

  8. #7
    Young Pup
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    Hi! My cutie pie Gabby was spayed last week. Was so very nervous when I sent her in for the Opp just because I hated leaving her there! But she's recovered quickly. The only thing is that she's spotting a bit today. I've phoned the vet and they say its normal. But will keep an eye on her and if by tomorrow I feel that it isn't any better I'm going to take her in.

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    All-American Dog nayers's Avatar
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    Lucy just got spayed last Friday...poor girl, I think it's harder on me and my wife than it is her...I do have one question, She went poop this morning for the first time since (2 full days) which is not normal for her, since she will normally go every morning. There was some bright red blood when I wiped her, is that normal due to the anesthesia? And perhaps not going for a couple days? Has anyone else had this happen? The vet thought it could be stress related and to keep a close(r) eye on her

  10. #9
    Young Pup louisore's Avatar
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    We had Luna spayed last Thur. it was also gut wrenching since they were making a larger then normal cut to address her hernia at the same time. She was very tired and complained a bit from the effects of the anesthesia the first day, but the next day she was much better. We had to keep a close eye on her to make sure she wouldn't jump up/down from the couch and also apply neosporin to her wound. She is doing much better now and the wound has significantly reduced in size.

    Does anyone know how long I need to wait to give her a bath?

  11. #10
    All-American Dog nayers's Avatar
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    The vet told us to wait 2 weeks to bathe her...Her poop returned to normal btw...must have been the effects of the anesthesia

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