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Thread: Preparing to bring home a new puppy - lots of questions!

  1. #1
    Young Pup
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    Default Preparing to bring home a new puppy - lots of questions!

    This is my first time on this forum because 3 days ago we placed our deposit on a Boston puppy (Pippi) that we will bring home in late January. I would be grateful for any advice/answers to some of the questions that I have. Everyone seems so kind and knowledgeable on this forum. I know some of my questions are silly, but I really want to do everything I can to be the best mom I can be. Sorry in advance for the long post!

    It has been 8 years since I've trained a puppy and I've never had a Boston before. I had an American Bulldog that unexpectedly passed away a few months ago due to an undiscovered tumor on her heart. It is difficult to even type about it, but I'm stating it because it is background for one of my questions below.

    A few questions that I would love some advice on are:

    1) Can anyone compare Bostons as puppies to other breeds? Having only raised large dogs, I'm not totally sure what to expect with a smaller dog of this breed. I've done some reading online and have read conflicting things about Bostons and training. I know every puppy is different, but if anyone has had large breeds (I have raised Golden Retrievers and an American Bulldog) and can tell me about the differences in their experiences, that would be wonderful (for example, both of our Goldens were crazy puppies! Our American bulldog was very, very easy).

    2) Crating at night: I'm one of those dog moms that lets her dogs sleep in the bed and on the furniture. One of the things I miss most about my Moo, who I lost this fall, is waking up to her snoring in bed. I plan to crate train our new puppy (Pippi) and I understand that you are supposed to keep the crate where you are the most, for me that would be the living room. However, I can't imagine leaving her downstairs alone in the crate at night. I know it is too early to let her sleep in the bed, but can I bring the crate upstairs at night without throwing off her sense of a comforting "den"? Should I have a separate crate upstairs? The bedroom is newly carpeted, but hopefully, that won't be an issue.

    3) This one is a little silly - but is there a standard size for a 9-week old puppy? My fiance and I are trying to prepare everything, including collars, leashes, comfortable sweaters, puppy "shoes" (we sometimes have glass come up in the backyard after rain and have always protected our dogs by giving them rubber bottomed dog booties).

    4) On a personal note, has anyone struggled with guilt in getting a new puppy after the loss of their beloved dog? I didn't think I could ever have another dog after I lost Moo in the fall, but our house has felt so empty (we don't have children, dogs are our children) and we have so much love to give. I am prepared for the fact that Pippi will be a puppy and therefore, I can't have the expectations of a calm, 8-year-old dog. Puppies can be hard, and I'm ready for that. What I'm worried about is the feeling that I'm somehow disrespecting Moo. She can never be replaced. I am still in mourning and cry about her daily. Has anyone experienced welcoming a new puppy while still grieving? Does the guilt go away? I realize this is more of a question for a therapist, but sometimes knowing that other people have experienced it too is helpful.

    SORRY FOR THE LONG POST!

  2. #2
    Young Pup
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    Here's a picture. She's on the far right. I'm also hoping that deafness won't be a concern based on her markings. She is on the far right.
    25530236_1692802000786342_2031809010_n (1).jpg25519849_1692807320785810_468002977_n.jpg

  3. #3
    Young Pup natleh's Avatar
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    Deafness should not be a concern for Pippi.

    Having raised cairn terriers and now a Boston (8 months), I can say that it has been a very different, unique experience with my Boston. But every personality is different too, so it’s now always about breed. With Elliott, I used two crates. One in the living room and one in the bedroom next to my bed (we started with one but it was a pain to move back and forth). Elliott hated daytime crate training so we really only used it at night and he was babygated in his room (dining room) when we did have to leave. After 6 months, he started sleeping in the bed as he was potty trained.

    The biggest difference you might notice with Pippi is energy level. I find Elliott is high energy, but in shorter spurts than a true high energy dog. They are very smart, and sensitive, so positive reinforcement goes a long way.

    As for passed-on pets, I would think their true desire would be for you to find happiness since they can’t be there with you. What they taught you during their lifetime you can now show Pippi. And you might even see bits of them in Pippi too. Elliott always does silly and very unique things that remind me of my previous dog, and I see that as a little nod from him, too. I think Pippi is going to bring you the great joy and unconditional love that you deserve!

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  5. #4
    Young Pup natleh's Avatar
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    Also, as far as clothing goes, she will likely be very tiny at 8 weeks (xs). And 8-10inch collar that is very thin should do, but you might quickly find yourself getting a harness instead. Boston’s have respiratory issues due to elongated palate and stenotic nares, and collars can aggregvate that (snorting, breathing difficulty if they pull).

    As for boots, Elliott is 8 months and wears an xxs in Muttluks brand, so you may need something very small - like for a Pomeranian, in the very beginning but she will grow quick!

  6. #5
    All-American Dog Kinshee's Avatar
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    Oh she is absolutely adorable!
    When my husband and I lost our first dog a lab mix to old age we only made it one month. Same thing when we lost our Eskimo mix. When we lost our 2 year old boxer to a congenital disorder we needed a bit longer. The guilt will subside and if you are like us you will have days you feel guilty for being happy with your new puppy but like the previous poster said the ones we've lost would want us to be happy and give another dog the great life we gave them.
    Moose is the first Boston Terrier for us. I think his training was very similar to our other dogs.
    We have always let our puppies sleep in bed with us. I am a very light sleeper and will get up with them as soon as they start to wake up. That being said Moose is on the larger side for a Boston and always has been. Full grown he is 34 lbs. If he had been a smaller puppy I may wanted to crate him instead.
    Looking forward to seeing more pictures!!!!

  7. #6
    Young Pup
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    Probably the easiest way to get a small dog is if you have never dealt with pets, because a small animal is always more docile than a large one.

  8. #7
    Young Pup
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    So, The most common problem with puppies is that they can not really control their trip to the toilet. Often they can pee on themselves and if you do not take good care of their hair, then there is a very unpleasant smell of urine from which is then very difficult to get rid of. Therefore, I immediately advise you to think about ways to care, you can buy a good shampoo for dogs, here is a selection of top best smelling dog shampoos. Wash the puppy no more than 3 times a week, because there may be problems with going to the toilet. Do not wash the dog very many times, a little care will be enough to keep it clean. I congratulate you on the appearance of a puppy!

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