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Thread: Puppy training tips (crate training, socializing, etc)

  1. #1

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    Nov 2006
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    Default Puppy training tips (crate training, socializing, etc)

    This thread will eventually contain numerous puppy training tips that will have your boston terrier puppy well on his way to becoming the well-behaved dog you want.

    Contents:
    1.1 Crate Training
    1.2 Socializing
    2.1 Chewing

    1.1 Crate Training
    There is nothing more fun than bringing home a new puppy -- for everyone except the person who has to clean up after him! While there is no fool-proof method for house training a puppy, crate training has proven to be a very successful method. Crate training effectively teaches the puppy to "hold it" until given the opportunity to relieve himself somewhere more suitable. However, this is not an excuse to crate your new puppy for long periods of time.

    This method of house training a puppy is based on the premise that a puppy would rather not mess up his living area if he doesn't have to. Puppies should NOT be left in a crate for too long. If your puppy goes to the bathroom in the crate because he could no longer "hold it," the training process will be drastically compromised.

    How does one handle house training a puppy in this manner?

    If no one is in your home during the day, you should put the puppy in a bathroom or another small, uncarpeted area in your home that can be blocked off. House training a puppy should only take place when you are at home. When you arrive home, take your pup out on a leash. After you play with him for a while put him in the crate. Wait an hour or so and then take him outside again. If he relieves himself, shower him with praise - you can't really go overboard in this step because it's essential for the puppy to understand how you pleased you are. If he doesn't go, put him back in the crate and try again about 45 minutes later. This process should be repeated until the puppy is successful.

    After he goes to the bathroom, he should be allowed to play free in the house. Some people find it helpful to keep a diary of the times their puppy goes to the bathroom. While this seems bizarre, it helps you to determine your puppy's habits, thereby enabling you to decrease the time he has to spend in the crate.

    The most important thing to remember with house training a puppy is to be consistent and offer him an enormous amount of praise. The process may take a while and it is important to understand that if the puppy has an accident during the training, it is okay. You should just increase the frequency of trips outside. If the puppy has an accident after its training has stopped, don't punish him, just revert back to the training process temporarily and you will be back on track in no time.

    1.2 Socializing
    In nature, the adult dogs and their brothers and sisters socialize a puppy. Puppies learn that when they bite too hard they get bitten back, or they are growled at buy the adult dogs. When the puppy is removed from the mother and brothers and sisters prior to this socialization, it is up to the humans to complete this training. When the puppy bites or chews and is hurtful, the adult must respond in a way that shows displeasure with the actions of the puppy. This usually involves a louder and rapid ?Ouch? or ?Don?t bite? followed by ignoring the puppy for a few minutes. Usually this is all that is required. If the dog is slapped or spanked when they bite, they may, in fact, become more aggressive as they are trying to tell you that they are being hurt. If your puppy does not respond to the ?Ouch? or ?Stop? command try substituting a chew toy to teach them the appropriate thing to bite on. They should be heavily praised for chewing on the toy and not biting a person.

    A puppy should be introduced to as many new types of animals, situations and environments as possible. This means that puppies should get the opportunity to ride in the car, walk through the park, and be around lots of other people, dogs and other animals. The more that puppies experience the world in a positive way the less likely they are to become aggressive or shy or fearful as adult dogs.

    Socialization can occur naturally if you take your puppy to the park or to a puppy obedience class. It is very important that you monitor the puppy?s response and offer support and encouragement or praise when the puppy interacts with other dogs in a desirable manner. Avoid situations where the puppy becomes frightened or fearful of other animals as this can prompt an aggressive response.

    By keeping the socialization positive and ongoing, it is relatively simple to keep your dog well behaved around other animals and people. If you have having challenges with socializing your puppy, consider taking an obedience class and getting the assistance of a professional trainer.

    2.1 Chewing
    Puppies inherently have a physical need to chew. It all has to do with the teething process. Just like a human baby, puppies have a great need to mouth and chew. This begins around three months of age. During this time, if your puppy doesn't have somthing to chew on, he will look for something. A puppy can entertain himself for hours if he has something to knaw on.

    Instead of waiting on a huge problem to start, control your puppy's impulse by following these steps:

    1. Always know where your puppy is and what he is doing. Treat him like a baby.

    2. Make sure that all socks, shoes, books, electrical cords, etc. are picked up off the floor. Put valuables away temporarily.

    3. If you have to leave him, make sure to put him in his crate.

    4. Make sure that what you have in his crate is allowed to be chewed. Use a meat-scented nylon bone as his chew toy.

    5. Put your scent on his chew bone before you leave him alone. He can then smell your scent and be comforted by it.

    6. Start preventing him from chewing by grabbing the scruff of his neck and gently shaking him whenever he is chewing a forbidden item. In nature, this is what his mother would do.

    7. Make sure your puppy gets plenty of exercise. That will prevent him from getting bored and starting destructive behavior.

    8. If you have to take an object from your puppy, do so gently and praise him when he gives it to you.

    There are plenty of different ways to cope with your puppy's chewing. Have plenty of patience and provide him with all the necessary toys he needs to keep himself occupied and away from your things and you'll save yourself a world of trouble.

  2. #2

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    What is wrong? Shae was doing so good with her house training. Only a accident maybe once a day, but all of a sudden she stopped doing good. I can take her out and stand there with her forever and she will not pee. She will come straight back in the house and pee in front of me. I have picked her up and put her back outside after saying NO to her firmly. But she is still doing it. She knows what she is doing cause when she does it she shys off from me. What am I to do? By the way she is 4 months old now.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for all of the info, I am still new at this potty training, I just finished potty training my 3 year old son, so I am hopping that this will not quite be as hard. I just wanted to mention that the way to tell a dog has to go is that it walks in circles, that has helped me a bunch. Thanks

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  5. #4

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    Default the crate

    Hi this is my first posting on crate training a week ago I brought home a three month male to be a companion to my two year old female. There was no problem with them getting along, other than the puppy angst that Panda has to put up with. Well, I introduced him slowly to the crate, with treats and eventually feeding him in there we are able to shut the door, but if he is left in there for longer then 15 minutes he HOWLS!! We have tried ignoring him etc but it doesnt seem to help! also, get this! he is trying to mount my female! ugh!Click here to enlarge

  6. #5
    Young Pup
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    when sassy was in the crate for longer than ten minuets she use to cry and bark and whine. also she would try to break out by chewing on the bars. but now she is older and knows when to go to the crate and i also have children so they will be play with her and dolls and when nobody is looking she slowly moves out of room and goes to her crate. she would be in the for about 30-70 mins. and nobody would realize that she had gone to take a nap.lol
    Sasha likes this.

  7. #6
    Young Pup teresatheboston's Avatar
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    My Teresa is 4 months now and she loves to be in her crate while I am at work. What I found worked for us was sticking the crate by our nightstand so that she got used to the crate and when I was home I would crate her on and off through out the day. Now she goes in her crate in the morning before work with no issues. Also we found giving her treats in her crate helped and also giving her toys to play with while in the crate as well.

    IMG152-1.jpg

  8. #7
    Young Pup
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    awwe thats tough! i found with crate training you need to start from day one of bringing home the pup or it is harder for them to adjust to. you have to be very consistent with using the crate or they don't accept it. i slowly introduced my boxer to it and it was a disaster! he hated it and never wanted to go in it. however my lab from day one of bringing him home we used the crate for sleeping at night, every time we left the house or if we couldn't watch him (you have to shower.) and he loves his crate! initially for one or two nights as a tiny pup he cried a little but he took to it almost immediately and it was not in our bedrooms it was down in our kitchen. it became his safe haven and his personal space when he wants to nap or have alone time. if you really want to use the crate stick to it it just may take a little longer if you didn't use it from the beginning. good luck to you.

  9. #8
    Young Pup
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    It's normal for a young puppy to be a little 'input-output' machine. Since puppies are growing and developing rapidly, they eat food often, burn up lots of energy and seem to need to eliminate constantly! They also have not yet developed bowel and bladder control, so they can't 'hold it'
    Certificate IV in Training and Assessment


  10. #9
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    If you want to train your dogs, you have to prepare a space for both of you to do every activity. In order to protect yourself and your puppy, I advise you to use artificial turf as a great space to train the dogs.

  11. #10
    Young Pup
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    I read and read, and finally tried treats! Worked like a charm!!! My Molly NEVER gets treats...ever....unless she goes potty outside. And they are good ones.... I made them myself from fresh deer meat. As soon as I started using treats, and if she had an accident I said the same word each time loudly and unhappily then put her in her crate minus all forms of pleasure...just her on the plastic... then I shut the light off. Waited about an hour, then took her outside with treat in my hand...let her smell it, sometimes she snuck a lick....but NADA til she went potty. On a leash, it kept her from wandering off, sniffing around and playing. It took some time, but me being patient, and truly and psychotically loving on her after she would potty; cheering her name, good girl, kisses, I even rolled on the ground and let her jump on my belly!!! She got it in a week!!! Same thing each time though...short quick word of reprimand, same wild wonderful love when doing good...and the lack of treats except when pottying correctly was the trick. Got it all from the dog whisperer guys show! Truly miraculous! Oh, and my longest time, holding the leash, waiting on her to pee was over an hour. But we sit long times waiting for our kids dont we?! Best of luck!
    foreverpa and Louie'sMomma like this.

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